Superintendent, Discusses Security Measures at Press Conference

Superintendent+Nate+Olson%2C+discuses+security+measures+taken+at+the+beginning+of+the+2018-19+school+year%2C+at+a+press+conference+on+Aug.+16.+Some+of+the+security+measures+included+more+cameras%2C+intercoms%2C+and+keypads.
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Superintendent, Discusses Security Measures at Press Conference

Superintendent Nate Olson, discuses security measures taken at the beginning of the 2018-19 school year, at a press conference on Aug. 16. Some of the security measures included more cameras, intercoms, and keypads.

Superintendent Nate Olson, discuses security measures taken at the beginning of the 2018-19 school year, at a press conference on Aug. 16. Some of the security measures included more cameras, intercoms, and keypads.

Boston Reynolds

Superintendent Nate Olson, discuses security measures taken at the beginning of the 2018-19 school year, at a press conference on Aug. 16. Some of the security measures included more cameras, intercoms, and keypads.

Boston Reynolds

Boston Reynolds

Superintendent Nate Olson, discuses security measures taken at the beginning of the 2018-19 school year, at a press conference on Aug. 16. Some of the security measures included more cameras, intercoms, and keypads.

Isabella Pierce and Tabatha Bunger

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Boston Reynolds
Superintendent Nate Olson, discusses security measures taken at the beginning of the 2018-19 school year, at a press conference on Aug. 16. Some of the security measures include more cameras, intercoms, and keypads for doors.

Security at Garfield County District High School was improved in the beginning of the 2018-19 school year. According to Superintendent Nate Olson, security increases are not due to student fault but more for problems occurring throughout our country.

“It’s better to be prepared for the worst and expect the best,” Olson said. That is exactly what they are doing.

According to Olson, a portion of the school’s federal funds have gone to improving student safety. The school approximately spent $20,000 on new additions to school security, including new cameras in each school and new intercoms throughout the high school.

At a press conference on Aug. 16, Olson remarked that the district had already updated the student technology (computers, etc.) in the previous school year. The purpose of increasing the school’s security was the hope of better protecting the staff and students from intruders. 

Clerk Anna Guesanburu went over the costs and thoughts on the new security. Guesanburu enjoys having more cameras and new intercoms. She likes the fact that we have better control over who enters the school. Guesanburu believes that there is always room for improvement of safety by adding more cameras and intercoms in the elementary.

“I feel that it is well worth it; the money being spent to do that. Like I said, the safety of the children and the school, you can’t put a value on that,” Guesanburu said.

Beth Lawrence, both a teacher and mother, thinks anytime we can get an upgrade on security we should take it. During the school day it doesn’t change much for her, but before and after hours it makes her feel safer. Lawrence had an experience last year that made her feel uneasy when a stranger appeared with a U-Haul van in the dark early hours before school one day and tried to get in the front doors. Lawrence was alone and unable to use her phone at the time because it was updating.

“[Upgraded security] sets people’s heart at ease,” Lawrence said.

Schools throughout the country have had major problems in the past and present with shootings and intrusions. Although Jordan Schools don’t have a reason to necessarily worry about school shootings or invasions, according to Olson, school administrators have a responsibility to take precautions.